CTC Conferences list

Registration for the conference is now open online:

http://www.en.cgs.aau.dk/research/conferences/ctc-2016/registration-fee/ .

Payment is by credit card only.

Don't miss the early bird registration deadline : 15th February 2016

 

The programme of the conference is now available here

Over 90 papers will be presented at the conference and there have been several papers submitted for the PhD Workshop.

 

 

 

 

 

CTC 2014   «Being, Becoming, Belonging »

Multidisciplinary Perspectives on Child and Teen Consumption - 6th International Conference

to be held at the University of Edinburgh Business School

 9 - 11 APRIL 2014

The 6th International CTC conference, sadly, is now over. It was an enjoyable and captivating conference with so many very interesting research studies presented. Thanks to all of those who presented their work and to all who attended the conference. Your contribution to the success of the conference was invaluable and we hope to see you all again in April 2016 in Aalborg, Denmark.

A very special thank you to David, Stéphanie and their team for their warm welcome and impeccable organisation, and the wonderful glimpse of Edinburgh they gave us. 

To view the programme go to the link below :

 

 http://www.business-school.ed.ac.uk/ctc2014/programme/

 

Our 2014 theme, Being, Becoming and Belonging, is based on the argument that children and young people are human beings as well as human becomings. This means that academics, practitioners and policy makers need to understand the current lived experience of children and young people as well as their development and potential.

Over the three days, we explored what being a young consumer means, and how various consumption practices relate to children’s sense of self. We also considered processes of becoming – cognitive, social, cultural, moral, and historical aspects of children’s development as consumers. We also examined the importance to children and young people of belonging – to families, peers, and wider communities, online and offline – for their current and future wellbeing and for their potential to be realised. Belonging also relates to important debates about inclusion, exclusion and integration, and about children’s rights, competencies and vulnerabilities. These issues were addressed in individual papers and explored through discussion within and beyond the conference sessions.

Given the global importance of these issues, we were delighted to receive submissions from 28 countries, and to welcome presenters exploring child and teen consumption in relation to these themes.

 

Keynote speakers:

Gary Cross, Penn State University

Patti Valkenburg, University of Amsterdam

Agnes Nairn, EM Lyon Business School

Sonia Livingstone, London School of Economics

Allison James, University of Sheffield
 

Conference Administration team: ctc2014@ed.ac.uk

 

This conference aimed to establish and continue a dialogue between specialists from a variety of academic disciplines in order to explore the phenomenon of children and teens as consumers in today's society.

During the two and a half days research was presented on the position of children and youth in consumer society, how children and young people develop their consumer competence and develop as consumers in general. The emphasis is on creating an inter- and multi-disciplinary discussion exploring and articulating ideas from historical, sociological, managerial and other social science perspectives.

The more specific aim of this conference was to strengthen the interdisciplinary approach of the conference by arranging sessions more thematically, as can be seen below, in particular on Food Consumption with a particular emphasis on Food, Communication, Life Style and Fashion consumption practices and behaviors involving children, adolescents and parents. The goal was to explore and stress the conflicts within the fields, to question the linearity of consumption and to highlight the double-sidedness of child and youth consumption. In this way we hoped to create meeting points in single sessions between theory, methodology, regulation and everyday practices. Furthermore, we aimed to highlight and address theoretical issues such as class, gender, ethnicity and consumer/marketing theories within consumption research. These perspectives were established through the keynote speakers and were elaborated on further and ran as a continuum through different sessions, presentations, individual papers as well as in coffee break discussions and evening talks.

Themes of the conference:
• Children and Teens in a Consumption Society
• Children, Youth and Consumerism
• Young Peoples Consumption
• Children, Teens and Parents as Consumers
• State Regulation NGO and the Self Regulating Market
• Advertising & Children and Youth
• Capitalism and the Commodification of Play
• Postmodernism and Media Consumption
• Childrens and Teens Media Culture
• Globalization, Regionalization and Individualization in Consumption Practices
• Consumer Education
• Consumption and Gender Identity
• Creating Consumer Citizens
• Branding Market, Children and Youth
• What is New about New Media in Consumer Society?
• Age and Consumption: Growing up a Consumer
• Consuming Tradition or Changing the Future?
• Childrens Bodies and Consumption
• Obesity: is Food Consumption a Child or Family Issue?
• Food Stuff: the Meaning of Representation
• Consuming Sustainable Consumption
• Food, Advertising, and Health

The Conference included keynote speakers, parallel sessions with chairs and appointed commentators, and poster sessions.

For this 5th edition of Child and Teen Consumption there was also a PhD & Master Students pre-conference Workshop  entitled "Research on Child & Teens Consumption. Present and Future Perspectives".

For further information: http://www.ctc2012.org/

 

The 4th International Child and Teen Conference was held from the 21-23 June 2010 and was hosted by Linköping University in Sweden.

This conference aimed to establish and continue a dialogue between specialists from a variety of academic disciplines in order to explore the phenomenon of children and teens as consumers in today’s society.

During the two and half days, research was presented on children’s and young people's position in today's consumer society, how children and youth develop their consumer competences and consumer socialization in general. Emphasis was on creating an inter- and multi-disciplinary discussion uniting ideas from historical, sociological, managerial and other social science perspectives.

The more specific aim of this year’s conference was to strengthen the interdisciplinary approach of the conference by arranging sessions more thematically. The aim was to explore and stress the conflicts within the field, question the linearity of consumption and highlight the double sidedness of child and youth consumption. In this way we hoped to create meeting points in single sessions between theory, methodology, regulations and everyday practices. A second approach was to highlight and put focus on theoretical issues such as class, gender, ethnicity and consumer/marketing theories within consumption research. These perspectives were established through the keynote speakers and they were elaborated on further and ran as a continuum through different sessions, individual papers as well as in coffee and evening discussions.

Themes of the conference:

• Competence and incompetence – Children in a consumption society
• State regulation NGO and the self-regulating market – Children, youth and consumerism
• Advertising for, and, or with children and youth
• Capitalism – The commodification of play
• Postmodernism and media consumption
• Globalization, regionalization and individualization in consumption practices
• Educating children/youth or the market?
• Creating consumer citizens – liberation or manipulation?
• Branding the market or branding children and youth?
• What is new about new media in consumer society?
• Age and consumption – Growing up a consumer
• Addressing young people – Is it possible for the market to grow up?
• Consuming tradition or changing the future?
• Children’s bodies and consumption
• Obesity – is food consumption a child or family issue?
• Food stuff – the meaning of representation
• Consuming sustainable consumption
• Victims or heroes? – young people’s consumption
• Newly published books

The keynote speakers covered issues of consumption theory, consumption in relation to gender, class, ethnicity with focus on children and youth.

For further information: http://www.tema.liu.se/tema-b/ctc2010?l=en

This conference aimed to establish and continue a dialogue between specialists from a variety of academic disciplines in order to explore the phenomenon of young consumers in today's society. During the two days, research was presented on children's and adolescents' position in the consumer society, how children develop their consumer competences and consumer socialization in general. The emphasis is on creating a multi-disciplinary discussion uniting ideas from historical, psychological, sociological, managerial and other social science perspectives.

The 3rd International Child and Teen Consumption conference was held on the 24-25th April 2008 and was hosted by the Norwegian Centre for Child Research in Trondheim, Norway. This conference aimed to establish and continue a dialogue between specialists from a variety of academic disciplines in order to explore the phenomenon of young consumers in today's society.

During the two days, research was presented on children's and adolescents' position in the consumer society, how children develop their consumer competences and consumer socialization in general. The emphasis was on creating a multi-disciplinary discussion uniting ideas from historical, psychological, sociological, managerial and other social science perspectives.

Themes of the conference:

• Children’s and young people’s consumption practices • Children’s roles in the consumer decision-making process • The history of children’s consumer culture • Media, consumption and youth culture • Consumer culture and childhood identities • Children and advertising • Consumer socialization • Media and consumer literacies • Ethics and children’s consumption • The globalization of children’s culture and youth culture • Marketing practices, rhetorics and appeals • Theories of consumer culture • The role of new media in consumer socialisation • Public policy and media regulation • Research methods to investigate child and teen consumption

For more information: http://www.svt.ntnu.no/noseb/Consuming/ctc2008.htm